Disc 2 - Frances Osborne - Lillas Feast (CD)

Read more Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. To her great-grandchildren, Lilla was both an ally and a mysterious wonder.

Her bedroom was filled with treasures from every exotic corner of the world. But she rarely mentioned the Japanese prison camps in which she spent much of World War II, or the elaborate cookbook she wrote to help her survive behind the barbed wire.

Born in to English parents in the beautiful North China port city of Chefoo, Lilla was an identical twin. Growing up, she knew both great privilege and deprivation, love and its absence. But the one constant was a deep appreciation for the power of food and place. From the noodles of Shanghai to the chutney of British India and the roasts of England, good food and sensuous surroundings, Lilla was raised to believe, could carry one a long way toward happiness.

Her story is brimming with the stuff of good fiction: distant locales, an improvident marriage, an evil mother-in-law, a dramatic suicide, and two world wars. In the world this magical food journal, now housed in the Imperial War Museum in London, everyone is warm and safe in their homes, and the pages are filled with cream puffs, butterscotch, and comforting soup.

In its writing, Lilla was able to transform the darkest moments into scrumptious escape. Read more Read less. I felt for Lilla, every step of the way The extraordinary life of this ordinary woman is a tumultuous feast of the senses. Her collection of exotic recipes were her souvenirs from the many outposts of the British Empire that she called home and became her connection to reality when her freedom was taken away. At the end of her life, Frances Osborne's one-hundred-year-old great-grandmother Lilla was as elegant as ever-all fitted black lace and sparkling-white diamonds.

Beneath its polished surface, Lilla's life had been anything but effortless. Lilla's remarkable cookbook, which she composed while on the brink of starvation, makes no mention of wartime rations, of rotten vegetables and donkey meat. Read more. Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. It was when the twins began to move around and talk—developing a twinly private language almost as soon as they did—that a difference emerged between them.

The moment Lilla opened her mouth, her stutter betrayed her, while Ada spoke in smooth, clear tones. There, they peered out over a harbor full of junks and, beyond them, to a volcanic reef of green pointed islands, like the spines on the back of a storybook dragon sitting down in the water.

They watched as a coastal steamer from Shanghai slid through the water and a regatta of tall, swaying sailing ships and puffing, coal-driven barges from India, from Russia, from Japan, some even straight across the Pacific from San Francisco, nudged their way into moorings.

They saw hundreds of barefooted coolies staggering up and down gangplanks—loading silks and peanuts to go to every corner of the world and unloading packages of narcotic brown powder from the hills of India—their conical straw hats shielding their dark-ringed eyes from the sun and hiding their sidelong glances in the direction of the sweet-smelling smoke seeping out from the doors of the opium dens.

And when Lilla and Ada played at being grown up, they strolled down the gentle slope on the far side of Consulate Hill that slid into the higgledy-piggledy beachfront. They promenaded, tiny parasols in hand, alongside the rattle of rickshaws and the pong of mule carts that wafted into the sea air.

They wandered past the whitewashed Western holiday hotels, past the clink of glasses on the suburban-style Chefoo Club terrace, and past the square, squat tower of the austere St. Wherever they were, Lilla was always abreast of Ada, as if she needed to make sure that she was never left behind again. They met aboard a salty steamer puffing the long haul from London to Australia in early The thought of becoming a bespectacled, gray-clad, hair-scraped-back, schoolroom-bound miss, even for a week, filled her with horror.

Both her parents had died by the time she was five years old, and Alice and her orphaned siblings had been split up. Her brother, Tom, had been dispatched to boarding school. Simons, near London. Although Mrs. Simons lived under a veneer of anglicization—calling her granddaughter Alice instead of her first name of Elizabeth—she was still so the story goes passionate about music and food in a thoroughly un-British way.

Alice grew up in a household where the smell of cooking was always in the air. One meal barely finishing before the stirring, baking, and roasting began for the next. Simons was well-off. Nonetheless, back at home, Alice and her grandmother would have been endlessly in and out of the kitchen. Popular Features. Home Learning. Lilla's Feast. Description The tale of Lilla, the author's great-grandmother, begins with her birth in Chefoo in China in , where she lived a charmed and Bohemian expat life, the younger of a set of 'heavenly twins' from a spirited, unvictorian family.

Lilla's eventful life was to span five continents and three husbands, forming a panoramic picture of British colonial life in the Orient during the Boxer Rebellion, Pearl Harbour, and the rise of Communism and under the British Raj in India. Throughout her life, Lilla's personal obession was cooking. A part from the fact that he loved boats, and dogs, precious little else is known about him, not even what he looked like—although from looking at his sons, he was probably fairly tall and thickset.

By the time the ship docked in Australia a couple of months later, Alice and Charles were engaged. Alice had escaped the schoolroom. Read more. Customer reviews. How are ratings calculated? Instead, our system considers things like how recent a review is and if the reviewer bought the item on Amazon.

It also analyzes reviews to verify trustworthiness. Top reviews Most recent Top reviews. Top reviews from the United States.

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. Verified Purchase. The world-wide expansion of European colonialism in the 19th century caused thousands of people, especially British, to seek their fortunes in the colonies and the trading emporiums in the exotic East, especially India and China.

Lilla, the great-grandmother of the author was one of them. She was born in Chefoo, China in and spent most of her life in China or India. Lilla never did anything of great importance, but she stands for all the Brits born and raised abroad who felt a bit foreign when they returned "home" to England on visits. During the course of her year life Lilla was present during the peak of Western power and prestige in the Orient before and its rapid decline thereafter culminating in World War II in which Lilla and her family ended up in a Japanese concentration camp.

We follow Lilla through marriages, births,deaths, family troubles in India and China, the hardships of Weihsien internee camp in China during World War II, and finally back to an uneasy old age in England -- the money, power, and prestige of life as a privileged Westener in China now gone. It's a good story to be read about a class of people who saw their pleasant lives and lucrative livelihoods destroyed by war and politics.

We don't feel all that sorry for Lilla, nor even that fond of her, but we are interested in her experiences. Along the way we get some fascinating pictures of the life of Brits in China -- and especially the hardships of Weihsien, a concentration camp that has catalyzed a sizeable body of literature.

See "The Call" by John Hersey, a novel about a missionary who is interned in Weihsien and "Shantung Compound" by Lawrence Gilkey, a sociological classic about people under the stress of imprisonment. I read this book at the recommendation of my sister, who knows I'm interested in the stories of individuals who survived the brutality and dehumanization of the events of World War II. I'm also especially interested now, because I'm living in Southeast Asia, in the stories of those who were part of the British Empire, which collapsed after the fall of Singapore.

Lilla's Feast fitted in well, but more than that, it rose above many other books in this category. The writing is beautiful; and the conceptualization of those parts of the story for which there is no documentation, and the characterization of those parts which are documented were superb.

The suffering which Lilla endured, both before and after the war, and in the subsequent years as well, was beautifully drawn and yet, although it was vivid, I was never so depressed by the conditions she endured that I couldn't keep reading.

In fact, I couldn't stop reading at every available moment, because Lilla's mode of survival was so comforting. The author, Lilla's great-granddaughter, talked to many family members and read every document she could find in order to tell this story, and the book has a richness of detail about life in a Chinese Treaty Port before World War I and about British Empire life in general which deepens the story for anyone interested in this period of history.

I have even recommended it to a friend going through a painful period in life because although Lilla survived dreadful conditions, she found the strength within herself to do so and to help others to do so. May we all find that strength within us.

I knew this book would be rich and insightful so I waited to read it during a calmer period in my life. I was not disappointed and my eyes watered over when it ended.

I admired Lilla for overcoming and living a long worthy life despite world changes, wars and the role of women. They met aboard a salty steamer puffing the long haul from London to Australia in early The thought of becoming a bespectacled, gray-clad, hair-scraped-back, schoolroom-bound miss, even for a week, filled her with horror.

Both her parents had died by the time she was five years old, and Alice and her orphaned siblings had been split up. Her brother, Tom, had been dispatched to boarding school. Simons, near London. Although Mrs. Simons lived under a veneer of anglicization—calling her granddaughter Alice instead of her first name of Elizabeth—she was still so the story goes passionate about music and food in a thoroughly un-British way.

Alice grew up in a household where the smell of cooking was always in the air. One meal barely finishing before the stirring, baking, and roasting began for the next. Simons was well-off. Nonetheless, back at home, Alice and her grandmother would have been endlessly in and out of the kitchen. Standing in their stiff Victorian dresses, using worn wooden spoons to try to scoop up squares of lamb bubbling in a stew, like small children attempting to catch leaves as they dance to the ground in autumn gusts.

Dipping their fingers into the powdery new spices that arrived from the far corners of the world and whose tastes must have made Alice dream of the smoky, heaving bazaars that she had seen pictures of in books.

And the table in the dining room next door laid, for just the two of them, as if for a feast. In the evening, Alice played the piano and sang. It was all she wanted to do, and Mrs. Simons hired her the best and most fashionable music master that either of them had heard of, to come to the house. Standing there, singing, being told that she was the most beautiful, talented creature alive, she must have felt as though she was opening the doors of heaven—her music master no doubt impressing upon her that he held the key.

And Mrs.

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9 Replies to “Disc 2 - Frances Osborne - Lillas Feast (CD)”

  1. Jan 09,  · “Passionately written and compelling, Frances Osborne's impressive debut is a wonderful read. The extraordinary life of this ordinary woman is a tumultuous feast of the senses.” -Santa Monefiore “LILLA'S FEAST is a captivating narrative of one resilient woman’s one-hundred-year journey through the cultural changes and political turmoil /5(30).
  2. Audio CD "Please retry" $ — $ Kindle $ Read with Our Free App Hardcover $ 25 Used from $ 2 New from $ 4 Collectible from $ Paperback $ 30 Used from $ 1 New from $ Audio CD $ 3 Used from $ At the end of her life, Frances Osborne’s one-hundred-year-old great-grandmother Lilla was as 4/4(20).
  3. Dec 18,  · Audio CD $ 4 Used from $ 2 New from $ At the end of her life, Frances Osborne’s one-hundred-year-old great-grandmother Lilla was as elegant as ever–all fitted black lace and sparkling-white diamonds. To her great-grandchildren, Lilla was both an ally and a mysterious wonder. Her bedroom was filled with treasures from every 4/5(20).
  4. Oct 26,  · Lilla's Feast by Frances Osborne, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. Lilla's Feast: Frances Osborne: We use cookies to give you the best possible experience/5().
  5. Frances Osborne + Follow Similar authors to follow + + + See more recommendations Something went wrong. Please try your request again later. OK Lilla's Feast Audio CD out of 5 stars 20 ratings. See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price 4/5(20).
  6. Sep 02,  · dowsoundcullaterni.meabsyluderbochanhillchrisamictrichul.co - Buy Lilla's Feast book online at best prices in India on dowsoundcullaterni.meabsyluderbochanhillchrisamictrichul.co Read Lilla's Feast book reviews & author details and more at dowsoundcullaterni.meabsyluderbochanhillchrisamictrichul.co Free delivery on qualified dowsoundcullaterni.meabsyluderbochanhillchrisamictrichul.cos:
  7. Feb 16,  · Lilla's Feast is a wonderful, inspiring book, part page-turner, part history of the British Empire in the Far East, Frances Osborne perfectly captures the stories of a lost generation of women -- Amanda Foreman Osborne tells the story of her great-granny's life Reviews:
  8. Sep 13,  · Lilla's Feast: One Woman's True Story of Love and War in the Orient: dowsoundcullaterni.meabsyluderbochanhillchrisamictrichul.co: Osborne, Frances: BooksReviews:

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